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Lipitor and Diabetes in Women

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As research showing a possible link between type 2 diabetes and Lipitor emerges, women taking Lipitor are seeking more information about diabetes symptoms and treatment.

Lipitor Risks May Include DiabetesType 2 diabetes, sometimes called diabetes mellitus, is a chronic metabolic disorder that occurs when the body can’t produce enough insulin, or can’t use the insulin it is producing. Diabetes is one of the most common medical disorders in the United States; the American Diabetes Association now estimates that 25.8 million Americans, or 8.3% of the population, have diabetes.

There are several known risk factors for developing diabetes, including family history, age and weight. In addition, taking the drug Lipitor or other medications in its class, called statins, may increase the risk of diabetes in some individuals. It seems that this risk may be particularly elevated in postmenopausal women.

If you are taking Lipitor and believe that you may be diabetic, it is important to speak to your doctor about diagnosis and treatment options.

Diabetes Risk Factors

According to the Mayo Clinic, risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes include1:

  • Family History – Type 2 diabetes is known to run in some families. Having a parent or sibling with type 2 diabetes can put a patient at higher risk for developing this disease.
  • Age – Type 2 diabetes occurs most commonly in older people, especially those over 45.
  • Weight – Being overweight or obese increases the likelihood that an individual will develop type 2 diabetes, though people of any weight can be at risk.
  • Prediabetes – Prediabetes is a condition in which blood sugar levels are elevated, but not enough to be classified as diabetes. If prediabetes is left untreated, it can progress into type 2 diabetes.
  • Race – People of certain races, including Asian-Americans, Hispanics, African-Americans, and American Indians, are at a higher risk of developing diabetes, though research has not identified the reason for this increased risk.

Symptoms of Type 2 Diabetes

Some “classic” symptoms of diabetes are:

  • Increased thirst and frequent urination
  • Increased hunger
  • Fatigue
  • Weight loss
  • Blurred Vision

Diagnosis of Diabetes

If a physician suspects that a patient may have type 2 diabetes, they will check their blood for elevated blood glucose levels. This is usually done with an A1C test, which gives a patient’s average glucose level over the past 3 months. The A1C test is widely used because unlike traditional glucose tests, it does not require a patient to fast before their blood is drawn.

A glucose level below 5.7 percent is considered normal. Levels between 5.7 and 6.4 percent are considered prediabetic, meaning the patient is at elevated risk for developing diabetes. Finally, a blood glucose level above 6.5 percent is considered diabetic.

Diabetes Treatment

  • Diet – One of the most important tools for controlling type 2 diabetes is diet. Experts recommend that diabetics eat a diet high in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains, and avoid animal products and refined sugar.
  • Exercise – Regular exercise is another important aspect of most diabetes treatment plans. Many doctors suggest exercising for at least 30 minutes most days of the week.
  • Medications – There are a number of medications on the market that are prescribed to treat diabetes. The most common, Metformin, increases the body’s sensitivity to insulin. Other medications, like sitagliptin and exenatide, cause the body to produce more insulin. Some people with type 2 diabetes also use injectable insulin to maintain a healthy blood sugar level.

Diabetes Complications

Diabetes is a lifelong disorder that requires continuous management. Additionally, there are serious complications associated with diabetes, including:

  • Nerve Damage, or neuropathy, causing numbness
  • Heart Disease
  • Kidney damage that can lead to kidney failure requiring dialysis
  • Eye damage, including glaucoma, cataracts, and retinopathy
  • Foot problems, including sores and poor circulation, which sometimes lead to amputation of the feet or legs

Although diabetes can be effectively treated, it has no cure. If you developed diabetes after taking Lipitor and are now facing a lifetime of managing this disease, you may be entitled to receive compensation.

Contact us today for a free consultation with a Lipitor lawsuit attorney about your case. We represent our clients on a contingency basis, which means there are never any legal fees unless we recover compensation in your case. Call us today at 1-888-578-4755 or fill out our short online contact form.

1.  Type 2 Diabetes Risk Factors
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